The Facts

High-Quality Early Childhood Education
Matters, and it Matters to Arizona Voters

Research shows that the first five years are the most critical in the development of a child’s brain. And, as children grow, achievement gaps can develop well before they even begin kindergarten.

A 2018 report shows that nearly half of all Arizonans live in a child care desert, making it difficult for parents to participate in the workforce.¹

SHORT-TERM IMPACTS

FACT:

$3 Billion

in revenue lost annually due to employee absenteeism as the result of child care breakdowns.²

ARIZONA VOTERS:

76% Agree

the state should invest in high-quality early childhood education opportunities for children from birth to five.³

BUSINESS COMMUNITY:

$1 invested

in high-quality early childhood education programs can lead to $16 back in the pockets of the community.⁴

SHARE YOUR SUPPORT

Quality early education is good for families, for businesses and the economy.

LONG-TERM IMPACTS

FACT:

Prepared for School

Children who attend high-quality early learning programs are more likely to graduate from high school and go on to attend college.⁵

ARIZONA VOTERS:

Overwhelmingly
Agree

66% of Arizona voters think the state should be doing more to ensure children begin kindergarten ready to learn.⁶

BUSINESS COMMUNITY:

16% Return

Research shows that investment in early childhood development can yield a public return of up to 16% per year, exceeding most other economic investments.⁷

INCREASE THE INVESTMENT

Additional investments are needed to provide access to quality early learning for Arizona children.

That investment means:

Increased

Decreased

Join Arizona voters in supporting affordable, high-quality early
education. Share these facts using our social media toolkit.

  1. A 2018 Center for American Progress report estimated 48% of Arizonans lived in a child care desert, defined as any Census tract with more than 50 children under age 5 that contains either no child care providers or so few options that there are more than three times as many children as licensed child care slots.
  2. The cost of absenteeism and turnover for employers in those states ranges anywhere from $414 million to almost $3 billion a year.
  3. 76% of likely voters said they support the state investing in high-quality early childhood education opportunities for children from birth to five years old, according to a newly released survey completed by Moore Information Group.
  4. $1 invested in high-quality early childhood education programs can lead to $16 back in the pockets of the community. That return can be seen in the form of reduced special education needs, higher rates of grade level retention, reduced incarceration rates, improved health, positive education and employment outcomes.
  5. Researchers from five universities, led by the Harvard Graduate School of Education, analyzed 22 high-quality studies, which were conducted between 1960 and 2016. This meta-analysis found that children who attended high-quality ECE programs were less likely to be placed in special education, less likely to be retained in a grade, and more likely to graduate from high school than peers who didn’t attend such programs.
  6. 66% of likely voters think the state should be doing more when it comes to ensuring children in Arizona begin kindergarten with the knowledge and skills they need to succeed. Other findings highlighted voters’ concern with quality, availability and the cost of early childhood education.
  7. Further, due to public benefits from reduced societal costs and increased tax revenue, early human capital investments yielded a public return of up to 16% per year, far exceeding that of most public projects undertaken for economic development.